Wednesday, October 14, 2009

What do dysfunctional Families Look Like?

Hi all,

Yesterday I was to participate in a mass blogging, but I'm up in the mountains and had trouble with my internet connection, so unfortunately, I'm a day late. But hopefully this'll still work and be fun. WOW! Women On Writing has gathered a group of

blogging buddies to write about family relationships. Why family relationships? We're celebrating the release of Therese Walsh's debut novel yesterday. The Last Will of Moira Leahy, (Random House, October 13, 2009) is about a mysterious journey that

helps a woman learn more about herself and her twin, whom she lost when they were teenagers. Visit The Muffin to read what Therese has to say about family relationships and view the list of all my blogging buddies. And make sure you visit Therese's website to find out more about the author."


Family relationships are complex and usually rife with conflict, which is why I too love to write about them. Okay, so I admit it's also great therapy--and cheaper than going to a therapist! Now that I've survived three teenagers and am living through the last child's angst-filled teenage years, I'm keenly reminded that dysfunctional is such a strange label—and far more common than one would credit.


This isn’t the 1950’s anymore and I’m not sure that the leave-it-to-Beaver families aren’t FAR in the minority. Perhaps dysfunctional families were common in the 50’s too, but hid under a shadow of shame and now-a-days it’s more in vogue to almost brag about family dysfunction or because the communication venues weren’t nearly as plentiful today, family problems simply weren’t splashed across the news and internet, hence they didn’t seem to exist.


Whatever the reason, I think the dynamics behind family dysfunctions are fascinating. When exploring dysfunctional families, I often discover not truly evil parents and family members who wish to harm others, but more weak or misguided people trying to do the best they can with what they have—and sometimes their best simply isn’t good enough.


What do you all think?

4 comments:

Therese Walsh said...

When exploring dysfunctional families, I often discover not truly evil parents and family members who wish to harm others, but more weak or misguided people trying to do the best they can with what they have—and sometimes their best simply isn’t good enough.

I agree with you. Though evil people do exist, I think most are trying to do their best.

Thanks so much for participating in the mass blogging effort for The Last Will of Moira Leahy. I appreciate it!

Theresa said...

Congratulations on your new release and thanks for stopping by, Therese! Sorry I'm a little late, but still glad to be able to participate.

Donnell said...

T. You summed up in your bottom line what the average dysfunctional family is. There's an old song called Little Boxes that we used to sing as school kids. (We all get put in boxes and we all go out to play). I cannot wait to get my copy of The Last Will of Moira Leahy. I was blessed to see it in draft form, and I know it's going to be sensational!

Audra Harders said...

Theresa, great reminder that we need not look for conflict beyond our own front door : ) Family relationships are fascinating, if not always satisfying. Trick is to use them to your best advantage and learn to accept the good with the questionable.

The Last Will of Moira Leahy sounds like a great read. Can't wait to buy it and dig in.